SC orders Animal Welfare Board to submit dog bite data for past 7 years – The New Indian Express

By PTI

NEW DELHI: The Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) to submit data on dog bites over the past seven years across the country and the steps taken to verify such incidents.

A bench of Justices Sanjiv Khanna and JK Maheshwari ordered the AWBI to file an affidavit outlining the details and also indicating whether they wanted the court to set the guidelines.

He also clarified that his 2015 order does not prohibit authorities or individuals, including registered companies, from applying to high courts or jurisdictional tribunals.

“We do not believe that it is the intention of this court in said order that all motions or proceedings before the HCs, civil courts and authorities be discontinued and that no effective order can be made by the HCs in matters concerning stray dogs.” the pew said.

The high court had previously said a balance had to be struck between human safety and animal rights and suggested that those who feed stray dogs could be held liable for vaccinating them and bearing the cost of treatment if someone is attacked by the animal.

The Supreme Court heard a batch of petitions on issues relating to ordinances passed by various civic bodies on the culling of stray dogs which have become a threat, especially in Kerala and Mumbai.

Some NGOs and individual petitioners have moved the supreme court against the rulings of some high courts including Bombay High Court and Kerala High Court to allow city authorities to deal with the threat of stray dogs in accordance with the rules .

NEW DELHI: The Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) to submit data on dog bites over the past seven years across the country and the steps taken to verify such incidents. A bench of Justices Sanjiv Khanna and JK Maheshwari ordered the AWBI to file an affidavit outlining the details and also indicating whether they wanted the court to set the guidelines. He also clarified that his 2015 order does not prohibit authorities or individuals, including registered companies, from applying to high courts or jurisdictional tribunals. “We do not believe that it is the intention of this court in said order that all motions or proceedings before the HCs, civil courts and authorities be discontinued and that no effective order can be made by the HCs in matters concerning stray dogs.” the pew said. The high court had previously said a balance had to be struck between human safety and animal rights and suggested that those who feed stray dogs could be held liable for vaccinating them and bearing the cost of treatment if someone is attacked by the animal. The Supreme Court heard a batch of petitions on issues relating to ordinances passed by various civic bodies on the culling of stray dogs which have become a threat, particularly in Kerala and Mumbai. Some NGOs and individual petitioners have moved the supreme court against the rulings of some high courts including Bombay High Court and Kerala High Court to allow city authorities to deal with the threat of stray dogs in accordance with the rules .

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