Animal Rights – Stichting ATAR http://stichtingatar.com/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 14:25:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stichtingatar.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4-150x150.png Animal Rights – Stichting ATAR http://stichtingatar.com/ 32 32 Animal rights activists return to Mediterraneo to demand its closure https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-activists-return-to-mediterraneo-to-demand-its-closure/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 14:25:55 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-activists-return-to-mediterraneo-to-demand-its-closure/ motion graffiti Tista’ taqra bil- Malta. Animal rights activists protested Saturday morning against the Mediterraneo Marine Park in Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, claiming the park encourages animal cruelty. Activists marched a short distance from a popular ice cream stand to the park, carrying signs saying “empty the tanks” and “your entertainment is our torture”, among other things. […]]]>
motion graffiti

Tista’ taqra bil-
Malta.

Animal rights activists protested Saturday morning against the Mediterraneo Marine Park in Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, claiming the park encourages animal cruelty.

Activists marched a short distance from a popular ice cream stand to the park, carrying signs saying “empty the tanks” and “your entertainment is our torture”, among other things.

The park has come under fire after it emerged that three of its dolphins died under mysterious circumstances, and no action has been taken against the so-called park.

The deaths were initially kept secret, with the park even claiming the dolphins had been transferred to Spain, according to Marine Connection UK. However, it was eventually established that the dolphins died of lead poisoning following an investigation by the Office of the Animal Welfare Commissioner.

Activists accused the park of negligence and said that although the administration says it was a one-time accident, eight other dolphins died at Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq Park.

Claria Cutajar, an activist with Moviment Graffitti, said the park and veterinary department had concealed the deaths, as she called on animal rights minister Anton Refalo and parliamentary secretary Alicia Bugeja Said to close the park.

She pointed out that circuses had been banned in Malta, however, the Mediterraneo Marine Park had been allowed to operate freely, with dolphins being forced to perform unnatural tricks to entertain the park’s paying patrons.

Katya Borg from Animal Liberation Malta said that in addition to the three dolphins who died of lead poisoning, eight others died under suspicious circumstances.

Romina Frendo of the Real Animal Rights Foundation also addressed the protest.

Saturday’s protest was organized by Moviment Graffitti and Animal Liberation Malta with support from Real Animal Rights (RAR), Extinction Rebellion Malta, Noah’s Ark Sanctuary, MSPCA, Association for Abandoned Animals (AAA), BICREF, Carers for Stray and Abandoned Felines (CSAF), Marine Connection UK, Friends of the Earth Malta and Nature Trust Malta.

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Animal rights activists call for closure of ‘circus’ of dolphins https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-activists-call-for-closure-of-circus-of-dolphins/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 10:53:00 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-activists-call-for-closure-of-circus-of-dolphins/ Updated at 3:36 p.m. with the Mediterraneo statement Dozens of people gathered in Baħar iċ-Cagħaq on Saturday to protest what they say is a dolphin park that promotes animal cruelty. Protesters marched towards the Mediterraneo Marine Park (MMP), carrying signs saying “your entertainment is our torture”, “empty the tanks” and “we must tell the horror […]]]>

Updated at 3:36 p.m. with the Mediterraneo statement

Dozens of people gathered in Baħar iċ-Cagħaq on Saturday to protest what they say is a dolphin park that promotes animal cruelty.

Protesters marched towards the Mediterraneo Marine Park (MMP), carrying signs saying “your entertainment is our torture”, “empty the tanks” and “we must tell the horror story of Mediterraneo”.

Ten police officers were on site, watched by several MMP employees from a distance.

Activists have been prompted to take action against the marine park after it emerged that three of its dolphins had died in mysterious circumstances.

They say the park, which is licensed as a zoo, is actually a circus and should therefore be banned.

Speaking at the protest, Claria Cutajar of Moviment Graffitti said the MMP and veterinary department had covered up the deaths of three dolphins.

She called on Animal Rights Minister Anton Refalo and Parliamentary Secretary Alicia Bugeja Said to stop ignoring the issues surrounding the MMP and shut it down.

“Circuses are illegal in Malta, but the MMP works,” Cutajar said, claiming the dolphins are forced to perform unnatural tricks to entertain the park’s paying patrons.

Katya Borg from Animal Liberation Malta said that in addition to the three dolphins who died of lead poisoning, eight others died under suspicious circumstances.

Places like MMP, she said, send the message to children that “people have a right to see wild animals doing tricks for entertainment.”

“Waving, kissing and posing for selfies is unnatural for a dolphin,” the activist said.

Romina Frendo of the Real Animal Rights Foundation said animal shows are a crime against nature.

“Do you want your children to swim with psychologically broken prisoners,” she asked parents who take their children to the park.

“Empty the tanks,” she shouted.

The three NGOs whose representatives spoke at Saturday’s event are part of a larger group of 14 NGOs pushing for the closure of the park.

Ramona Frendo addresses the demonstrators. Activists say the park should be closed. The banner reads “a park of abuse”. Photo: Matthieu Mirabelli

MMP fell into the spotlight last summer when three dolphins, Mar, Onda and Melita, died of lead poisoning.

The park has not announced the deaths, which have been revealed by animal rights activists, and said after they were made public that the dolphins in question died following an ‘accident’ which had them poisoned.

A report by the Animal Welfare Commissioner however concluded that the MMP and veterinary authorities had shown levels of “negligence and mismanagement” in the handling of the case.

The MMP says it operates an educational facility that teaches visitors about dolphins.

Dolphins and other marine mammals perform tricks during live shows, and marine park guests can swim with the dolphins for an additional fee.

He defended his practice of performing tricks on the dolphins, arguing that such activities are necessary because they “allow the veterinarian to check on the health of the animal”.

Animal rights organizations say the allegation is false and that the park actually operates an animal circus. Such circuses were made illegal years ago.

Mediterraneo responds

Mediterraneo Marine Park, however, argued that protesters were spreading lies about the park based on outdated information.

“The park follows strict standards and regulations in line with the latest European directives. This is a highly regulated industry and we take our responsibilities very seriously,” the park said in a statement.

Mediterraneo insisted that the dolphin presentations at Mediterraneo Marine Park were educational and had a veterinary function that helped them protect the dolphins’ welfare on a daily basis.

The park also denied that the accidental dolphin deaths last year were in any way mysterious or hidden.

“We immediately reported the deaths to authorities and conducted transparent investigations which identified what was wrong: lead poisoning caused by strictly prohibited equipment used by an external diver who was cleaning one of the pools,” said the park.

They assured the public that they had taken steps to ensure the tragedy did not happen again.

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This GW Animal Law program aims to strengthen animal rights https://stichtingatar.com/this-gw-animal-law-program-aims-to-strengthen-animal-rights/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 12:00:04 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/this-gw-animal-law-program-aims-to-strengthen-animal-rights/ animal lawyer Kathy Hesler was a vegetarian until 1988, when a PETA booth on the National Mall convinced her that dairy cows are often abused. “I thought I had already made the right decision to become a vegetarian, but I was still complicit without realizing it,” she says. This experience made her vegan. “I was […]]]>

animal lawyer Kathy Hesler was a vegetarian until 1988, when a PETA booth on the National Mall convinced her that dairy cows are often abused. “I thought I had already made the right decision to become a vegetarian, but I was still complicit without realizing it,” she says. This experience made her vegan. “I was kind of stunned by what I didn’t know.”



Kathy Hessler is director of the Animal Legal Education Initiative at George Washington University School of Law. Photo courtesy of GW Law School.

Now director of Animal Legal Education Initiative, which launched at George Washington University School of Law in March, Hessler has made spreading knowledge his mission, especially when it comes to animal welfare laws. While animal law is something of a backwater in the legal profession (few schools offer animal law courses, let alone a comprehensive curriculum), the Animal Legal Education Initiative aims to make it a core discipline. To do this, the faculty creates a curriculum that can be rolled out to other schools, evangelizes the relevance of animal law to other legal areas – environmental law, health law, property crimes, etc. – and pleads for a better regulatory framework for animals.

Hessler, who grew up in Massachusetts and New Jersey and went to GW as an undergrad, is interested in treating “invisible” animals: the kind that don’t live in our homes. She wants to “elevate animals to the level of visibility” so that our society can make informed decisions about how to treat them. Rather than criticizing individual carnivores, scientists, or industrial farmers, Hessler takes aim at oppressive systems. “People are rational actors,” she says, “so let’s talk about why they do what they do, and try to change the math they use.”



According to Hessler, the best way to achieve this is to strengthen the laws. Our nation’s current animal welfare laws are piecemeal. Animal Welfare Act, for example, is riddled with industry exclusions (lab rats aren’t considered animals, to begin with). In addition, animals are generally considered property, which makes them difficult to protect.

Strengthening the law would clearly benefit animals, but Hessler insists it’s also a boon for humanity. Animal welfare and human well-being are closely linked; farm animals fuel climate change, for example, and most emerging viruses (including coronavirus, HIV and Ebola) come from animal sources. “If we don’t regulate the use and abuse of animals, we’re going to have these results,” she says. “Even if you don’t care about animals, how we treat them affects you.”

This article appears in the November 2022 question from the Washingtonian.

Sylvie McNamara
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Maltese animal rights groups list 10 broken promises https://stichtingatar.com/maltese-animal-rights-groups-list-10-broken-promises/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 12:07:49 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/maltese-animal-rights-groups-list-10-broken-promises/ A group of animal rights groups have written an open letter to Prime Minister Robert Abela demanding action on animal welfare and protection legislation. 18 different animal rights groups have issued a written appeal asking for a quick response and swift action by the government. “Over the past months and years, we have brought to […]]]>

A group of animal rights groups have written an open letter to Prime Minister Robert Abela demanding action on animal welfare and protection legislation.

18 different animal rights groups have issued a written appeal asking for a quick response and swift action by the government.

“Over the past months and years, we have brought to the attention of your administration a list of basic needs which are absolutely necessary to help improve the lives of animals in Malta and Gozo,” the letter reads.

“In principle, and in our eyes, the ministry has always been on board and welcomed our ideas and suggestions, but for the most part none of them have been delivered.”

The lack of action has concerned groups willingly accepting more than they can handle. The protests seem to have fallen on deaf ears and the groups feel like they are in the wrong tree.

Below is a list detailing the demands made by the various advocacy groups, all of which have been accepted by the government but have yet to be implemented:

Parliamentary Secretary for Animal Welfare Alicia Bugeja Said

𝟏. 𝐁𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧
𝟐. 𝐌𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐨𝐠𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐭 general of animal welfare (aw) 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐚 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨
𝟑. 𝐀 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝟏𝟕𝟏𝟕 𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐦𝐛𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐛𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐯𝐮𝐥𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭
𝟒. ???
𝟓. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐝𝐨𝐠𝐬 𝐝𝐨𝐠𝐬
𝟔. ???
𝟕. 𝐆𝐫𝐨𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐏𝐞𝐭 𝐒𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐋𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧
𝟖. 𝐈𝐦𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 zo𝐨 l𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 and r𝐞𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬
𝟗. 𝐎𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐦𝐢𝐜𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐩𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐠
𝟏𝟎. 𝐀𝐧 𝐀𝐖 𝐞𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐳𝐨

“The government keeps saying that most of the above is in the works, but we have waited and waited and waited, while watching the suffering increase and the situation worsen,” the letter read.

The letter was signed by the following organisations:

Real Animal Rights Foundation – RAR Malta Vo1976, The Island Sanctuary Malta, Association for Abandoned Animals, Animal Liberation Malta, Buddy’s Lost & Found Page – Maxine, CLAWS – Cat Lovers Adoptions, Welfare & Support, MSPCA, Gozo SPCA, CSAF[CarersforFélinserrantsetabandonnés}TomasinaCatSanctuaryAnimalCareMaltaInnocentPaws-MariaD’AmatoNoah’sArkMalta-DogsforAdoptionFostering&HomingPawsKittyGuardiansForStraysShinyPawsVoicefortheVoicelessRMJ’sHorseSauvetage[CarersforStrayandAbandonedFelines}TomasinaCatSanctuaryAnimalCareMaltaInnocentPaws–MariaD’AmatoNoah’sArkMalta–DogsforAdoptionFostering&HomingPawsKittyGuardiansForStraysShinyPawsVoicefortheVoicelessRMJ’sHorseRescue[CarersforFélinserrantsetabandonnés}TomasinaCatSanctuaryAnimalCareMaltaInnocentPaws-MariaD’AmatoNoah’sArkMalta-DogsforAdoptionFostering&HomingPawsKittyGuardiansForStraysShinyPawsVoicefortheVoicelessRMJ’sHorseSauvetage[CarersforStrayandAbandonedFelines}TomasinaCatSanctuaryAnimalCareMaltaInnocentPaws–MariaD’AmatoNoah’sArkMalta–DogsforAdoptionFostering&HomingPawsKittyGuardiansForStraysShinyPawsVoicefortheVoicelessRMJ’sHorseRescue

Animal activists Moira Delia, Romina Frendo and Fiona Broome Camilleri also signed the letter.

Do you agree with these proposals?

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Brutal trip to slaughterhouse ignites beef with animal rights activists https://stichtingatar.com/brutal-trip-to-slaughterhouse-ignites-beef-with-animal-rights-activists/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 13:00:36 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/brutal-trip-to-slaughterhouse-ignites-beef-with-animal-rights-activists/ KAMPALA, UGANDA – As soon as the truck stops, Joseph Lubwama jumps out and begins unloading 24 tightly wrapped cattle he has brought to the slaughterhouse in Kampala city. He begins by unraveling a web of ropes used to tie the cattle’s long horns to the rails of the truck bed to hold them still. […]]]>

KAMPALA, UGANDA – As soon as the truck stops, Joseph Lubwama jumps out and begins unloading 24 tightly wrapped cattle he has brought to the slaughterhouse in Kampala city. He begins by unraveling a web of ropes used to tie the cattle’s long horns to the rails of the truck bed to hold them still. They traveled 250 kilometers (155 miles) from Kiruhura, a rural district in southern Uganda. One by one, the animals get out of the truck. They look tired.

“For animals to travel so long tied to one position by the horns and tail is uncomfortable,” Lubwama says, as he begins to drag them out of the truck.

What seemed like real worry melts away when Gaju, a bull with the majestic horns typical of the Ankole breed, wobbles, falls in the middle of the truck bed and can’t get up.

“Get up Gaju! Come on, come on, come on, Gaju, come on,” Lubwama shouts, kicking the animal and hitting it mercilessly with a cane.

When Gaju isn’t moving, Lubwama finds support on the truck’s cargo cage frames and kicks the animal hard using both of his legs with his heavy rubber boots. The apparent pain forces Gaju to gather his strength, get up and stagger out of the truck.

Kampala’s steady population growth over the past three decades has created a strong demand for beef. But the city doesn’t allow cattle ranching within its boundaries, which means people like Lubwama have to bring in cattle from ranches hundreds of miles from the city’s slaughterhouses. But the inhumane way in which cattle are transported has led to a debate between animal rights activists and vets who are calling for government intervention, and cattle dealers who say they would lose money if the current laws were enforced.

Since 1992, the capital has recorded an average annual population growth rate of at least 5%, increasing the number of inhabitants from around 830,000 to more than 3.6 million in 2022, according to United Nations World Urbanization Prospects data. The average Ugandan consumes about 9 kilograms (20 pounds) of beef a year, with Kampala district accounting for the largest portion, 7% of the country’s annual production of 185,709 metric tons, according to a report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

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EDNA NAMARA, YPG UGANDA

Cattle traders and herders watch as a load of cattle is brought to a staging area at the Kampala City slaughterhouse. Growing demand for meat in Kampala means livestock have to be transported from far away, raising concerns about animal cruelty.

David Kakooza, a veterinary assistant who keeps records of the overloaded cattle trucks arriving at the slaughterhouse daily, says he does not feel good seeing the animals arrive so tired. He wants the government to be able to enforce existing laws and regulations that are supposed to ensure that animals are not tortured during transport.

“Animals have rights too,” Kakooza said as he inspected a truck carrying 21 head of cattle.

Standing Orders from the Uganda National Bureau of Standards state that trucks “shall have sufficient space for the comfort of meat animals during transit, cattle placed transversely on a truck should allow 50-60cm of truck length for each animal”. Transport of animals for slaughter “must be done in a way that minimizes stress, pain and suffering”, according to the guidelines. There is also the Animals (Prevention of Cruelty) Act, which states that anyone who “cruelly beats, kicks, abuses, crushes, overwork, overloads, tortures or infuriates any animal” is guilty of the crime. of cruelty.

Siraj Katangawuzi, the imam of Nansana Parish, says he wants to see these laws and regulations strictly enforced to ensure animals are transported without suffering. He says a simple change the government could make is to require the use of wood instead of ropes to prevent cattle from falling over during transport. The government should also educate Ugandans on the importance of being kind to animals and revoke the licenses of those who refuse to obey the law.

“Ugandans need to realize that everything that breathes has feelings,” says Katangawuzi. “It’s impossible for humans to walk all that distance without changing position, but cows have feelings too, so they shouldn’t be tethered so mercilessly.”

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EDNA NAMARA, YPG UGANDA

Workers inside the Kampala City slaughterhouse weigh and cut meat to buyers’ specifications.

Dr Dickson Tayebwa, an animal welfare advocate and veterinarian who teaches at Makerere University, says existing laws are not being enforced because the “big men” – powerful government officials who own vast ranches of livestock and numerous trucks transporting animals to slaughterhouses in Kampala – dominate the meat industry.

“Their trucks have papers indicating that they are special,” explains Tayebwa. “So the officers manning the roadblocks can’t say anything, even when it’s clear the laws are being broken.”

An official from the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, who wishes to remain anonymous for fear of reprisals, admits that the presence of powerful people in the industry makes government regulation difficult.

“They are untouchable,” said the officer.

David Kasura Kyomukama, the ministry’s permanent secretary, says he cannot comment on the issue of senior government officials obstructing law enforcement. But he says the department is trying to convince people in the industry that following the laws and regulations would be in their best interests.

“Animals are animals, so they can’t be treated like people, but they can be treated well during the trip so that we get money from it,” Kyomukama says. “If you treat animals in a way that stresses them out, you won’t get their full value because some may lose weight or even die.”

“If you treat animals in a way that stresses them out, you won’t get their full value because some may lose weight or even die.”Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries

Kyomukama says the ministry plans to set up abattoirs in parts of the country so that animals are slaughtered closer to where they were raised and their meat transported to Kampala and other urban centres. It doesn’t say when that might happen.

Kampala City Council Veterinarian Dr Hannington Katumba agrees that treating cattle well would benefit the cattle industry and consumers, as healthy cows produce high quality meat. He explains that when a cow reacts to high levels of stress, her body excretes lactic acid, which increases acidity and prevents the meat from settling.

“It’s the ugly meat that we sometimes see in the stalls. He looks beaten,” says Katumba.

The fact that Ugandan culture generally does not value animal welfare has made it harder to end animal cruelty. Samuel Bwanakweri, a herder from western Uganda who has been in livestock trading and transport for 21 years, laughs when asked why animals are treated so cruelly during transport to slaughterhouses.

“What’s all the fuss about?” They’re heading for the slaughterhouse,” he said in a neutral tone. “Isn’t it ironic to feel sorry for an animal you’re going to kill?”

Animal disorders

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Bwanakweri says he spends a lot of money transporting cattle as far as 320 kilometers (nearly 200 miles) to slaughterhouses and following regulations would not make economic sense. To break even, he says he needs to have 23 cows in each truck because he has to hire four handlers at 100,000 Ugandan shillings ($26) each. He also pays the owner of the truck and the bank that gives him business loans.

Although not as dismissive of animal welfare as Bwanakweri, Bonny Katambula, a member of the Kampala City Slaughterhouse Committee, agrees that if existing laws and regulations were to be strictly enforced, many resellers would go bankrupt. He says the ideal number for large trucks should be 20 cows.

“A man cannot hire a truck for a million shillings [$260], drive it into the country for cattle and come back with only 10 cows,” he says. “It defeats the economic purpose.”

Lubwama says his goal is to advance in the beef industry. As a cattle driver, he earns 100,000 shillings ($26) for each of the three trips he makes each week. He works hard to save money so he can have one of his own cows in the truck.

“My dream is to slowly expand my business and be able to fill a truck with my cattle,” he says as he drives Gaju and several cows around the yard for fodder, water and rest.

After 12 p.m., he will drive Gaju to the slaughterhouse, where the bull’s journey will end. The meat will be processed and the health inspector will stamp it to certify that it has been checked for disease and deemed safe for human consumption. Lubwama will return to Kiruhura and load the truck with more cattle for its next trip to Kampala to help quell the city’s thirst for beef.

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Animal rights group calls on Ant and Dec to resign from I’m a Celebrity https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-group-calls-on-ant-and-dec-to-resign-from-im-a-celebrity/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 15:57:12 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-group-calls-on-ant-and-dec-to-resign-from-im-a-celebrity/ animal rights organization Peta wrote an open letter calling for Ant and Dec resign from I’m a celebrity… Get me out of here! The popular TV duo, real names Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnellyreturn to host the long-running reality series, which begins in a few days. i am a celebrity drew criticism from animal rights […]]]>

animal rights organization Peta wrote an open letter calling for Ant and Dec resign from I’m a celebrity… Get me out of here!

The popular TV duo, real names Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnellyreturn to host the long-running reality series, which begins in a few days.

i am a celebrity drew criticism from animal rights groups throughout its run, with the use of live and dead animals in “bushtucker trials” being a recurring source of controversy.

Peta previously called for a boycott of the show because of the “animal cruelty” involved in the show.

Now, Peta has sent an open letter to Ant and Dec urging them to disassociate themselves from the production.

In a letter sent to popular presenters on Thursday and shared on the organization’s website, the group told the couple, “For too long you have been complicit in animal cruelty on the show, and it must stop.

“The longer you associate yourself with this show, the more you send the message to viewers that you believe animal abuse is not only acceptable but also entertaining.”

The letter claims that the ‘public attitude’ towards the use of animals on screen has ‘significantly’ changed in recent years, citing the more than 50,000 people who have backed Peta’s petition urging ITV to stop “abuse” animals in the series.

He also notes that 10,000 people complained to Ofcom last year about the treatment of animals on the show.

Last year’s ‘I’m a Celeb’ series featured plenty of animal-related essays (ITV/Shutterstock)

“Time to read the writing on the wall,” the letter continues. “For 20 years you have been complicit in the ‘bushtucker trials’, standing aside as animals of all kinds are tormented – and even killed – for TV audiences.

“At this moment, you must have become aware of the pain, discomfort and fear that these reluctant participants endure during the challenges. Ostriches, crocodiles, snakes, rats and thousands of insects have been exploited for the series’ childish pranks – and we fear the next series will be no different.

The letter, which can be read in full hereconcludes by saying: “Leave i am a celebrity would signal to the show’s producers that people will no longer put up with senseless animal cruelty and that it’s time for a change. So please hang up your hats and get out of there – for the love of animals.

Ant and Dec are longtime hosts of

Ant and Dec are longtime hosts of ‘I’m a Celeb’ (ITV/Shutterstock)

A spokesperson for the show said in response, “We are always completely transparent about our protocols and we have a very strict environmental plan in place on the show. As a production, we comply with all regional and national laws regarding the use of insects, animals and reptiles.

“Welfare and safety are always the top priority in all of our programs, and at any Bushtucker trial that features animals, we have trained and experienced animal caretakers on site at all times. We keep the RSPCA NSW informed of all our activities at the show and they have an open invitation to attend the site at any time.

“We cannot stress enough that we have rigorous protocols in place to ensure that animals are handled safely at all times, before, during and after any filming, in accordance with all regional and national laws.”

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Animal rights activist takes Switzerland to court after being denied vegan meals in prison https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-activist-takes-switzerland-to-court-after-being-denied-vegan-meals-in-prison/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 06:29:32 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/animal-rights-activist-takes-switzerland-to-court-after-being-denied-vegan-meals-in-prison/ Switzerland is being sued after failing to provide proper vegan meals to an animal rights activist in prison. The anonymous activist was serving time in a facility in Geneva after breaking into and damaging a number of slaughterhouses, butchers and restaurants. After a few days of incarceration, he complained to prison authorities that he was […]]]>

Switzerland is being sued after failing to provide proper vegan meals to an animal rights activist in prison.

The anonymous activist was serving time in a facility in Geneva after breaking into and damaging a number of slaughterhouses, butchers and restaurants.

After a few days of incarceration, he complained to prison authorities that he was not provided with sustainable plant-based meals. It is believed that he could only eat hamburger buns, rice and side salads.

He also refused to take a B12 supplement until the prison provided a plant-based one. Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to damage to the nervous systemand it is vital that vegans get the recommended dose either through supplements or fortified foods.

The activist was later diagnosed by a prison doctor as suffering from iron deficiency, constipation and haemorrhoids.

Adobe Stock Activist was serving time after breaking into slaughterhouses and butchers

Prison response

According the Guardian, the prison rejected a written request asking him to receive appropriate vegan meals. The establishment responded by saying that measures had already been put in place to ensure that the activist had a diet as close as possible to his convictions.

In June 2020, an appeal was deemed inadmissible by the Swiss Federal Court. The prisoner’s lawyer then brought the case before the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) based in Strasbourg. The ECHR is made up of 46 judges from several countries – including the UK, Norway and Turkey – which have signed the European Convention on Human Rights.

The call

Another vegan who was denied proper meals while on a psychiatric ward at a hospital also joined the call.

The Strasbourg court has now allowed the appeal. Notably, it rejects around 95% of appeals, indicating a major shift in recognizing veganism as a protected belief.

The court asked the Swiss state to examine whether the prison violated Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which states that “everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion”.

Veganism is experiencing a resurgence in popularity in Switzerland. We think around four percent of the population now follow the lifestyle.

In June this year, an independent think tank in the country predicted that Switzerland would be completely meatless by 2050.

Veganism as a protected characteristic

This isn’t the first time someone has taken legal action because of their veganism.

In the UK in 2020, an employment tribunal ruled that veganism was a philosophical belief protected by law against discrimination.

The decision came after a vegan named Jordi Casamitjana claimed he was unfairly dismissed by an animal welfare organization – League Against Cruel Sports – after raising concerns that his pension fund had invested in businesses linked to animal testing.

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Two recent court cases change the future of the animal rights movement https://stichtingatar.com/two-recent-court-cases-change-the-future-of-the-animal-rights-movement/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 18:11:36 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/two-recent-court-cases-change-the-future-of-the-animal-rights-movement/ A jury in Utah’s Red State acquitted two animal rights activists on trial for burglary and theft for removing two sick piglets from a factory farm in Smithfield, Utah in 2017. It was a surprise victory for the animal rights movement – ​​and a potential way forward for a more strategic form of civil disobedience. […]]]>

A jury in Utah’s Red State acquitted two animal rights activists on trial for burglary and theft for removing two sick piglets from a factory farm in Smithfield, Utah in 2017. It was a surprise victory for the animal rights movement – ​​and a potential way forward for a more strategic form of civil disobedience.

Saving animals that have little value for the industry

The defendants – Wayne Hsiung, representing himself, and Paul Picklesimer’s lawyer – sought to convince to the jury that they were saving two visibly sick and injured piglets, without stealing property of any value from Smithfield.

Removing just a few animals from a farm is a tactic known as “open rescue” favored by Direct Action Everywhere (DxE), the animal rights group Hsiung co-founded. By saving one or two sick and suffering animals – animals that already have little economic value for the livestock industry – activists avoid the criticism often leveled at more public and disruptive forms of protest, that activists are insensitive to workers and people who walk around their business. Responses to recent climate events involving throw soup (and mashed potatoes) in front of a famous painting or block the roads in London indicate how quick the public can be to reject activism that they see as grandstanding.

This strategy also reveals how futile the livestock industry’s welfare claims can be. Smithfield’s vice president of corporate affairs said in A declaration following the trial’s conclusion that “any deviation from our high standards of animal care…would never be tolerated”. If that were true, their case against two injured and malnourished piglets being taken away for veterinary care seems flimsy indeed.

In that case, the defense successfully persuaded the jury that Smithfield was not concerned about the welfare of the two piglets despite the judge’s decision to ban showing footage of the poor conditions at the farm. Hsiung and Picklesimer testified that when they chose to save the piglets, they were acting out of compassion and not just trying to hurt Smithfield.

This matters because the real problem – that the welfare of pigs was being actively neglected – turned out to be at the heart of this case. The unfolding of this case allowed the defendants to focus not on their methods but on their message. Since Hsiung was sentenced flight last year for leading an outdoor rescue of a sick kid in North Carolina, the outcome of the Smithfield case is all the more significant.

It’s a blow to Smithfield and the meat industry in general both in the risk to its reputation and in its efforts to punish animal advocates. Over the past decade, the industry has struggled to move “ag-gag” laws that make it illegal to document farming conditions on private property, despite public interest in transparency about how food is made.

“I think it will make prosecutors much less willing to criminalize and indict animal rights activists,” says Marina Bolotnikova, who covered the Smithfield trial for the Intercept. “Losing lawsuits is terrible and costly for them, and now they see DxE are not easy targets – they can make very compelling cases in court, even in a very conservative county.”

Activists who disrupt can face dire consequences

The Smithfield decision contrasts sharply with the case of the activists convicted in Canada on October 12. Amy Soranno and Nick Schafer were sentenced to 30 days in prison and 12 months probation for their participation in the “Meat the Victims” action at Excelsior Hog Farm, in which around 60 activists occupied one of the pigsties for several hours. The president of the court said that The “general deterrence” of activists seeking to break the law “for political gain” was the “most important factor” in his sentencing decision.

As Excelsior activists were actively disrupting farm affairs, they may have had difficulty convincing a jury that they were acting in the best interests of suffering animals first and foremost. Alongside the Smithfield trial, the defense was also barred from showing most of its evidence about conditions inside the farm.

This meant the defense was unable to argue that Excelsior Farm engaged in cruelty to animals and that the activists acted out of necessity. The “necessity defense,” as Bolotnikova explains in her reporting for The Intercept, is meant to prove that the activists were trying to “prevent imminent harm.” The trial therefore remained firmly focused on the laws broken by the activists, which may have placed the defendants in a more difficult position.

The punishment of Soranno and Schafer sets a disturbing new precedent in Canada. The judge “breaks with decades of legal precedent by sentencing Amy Soranno and Nick Schafer to prison for a peaceful, non-violent act of civil disobedience – a first in Canada,” said Camille Labchuk, executive director of Animal Justice . Their sentences are also harsher than those handed down to Canadian farms found guilty of animal cruelty. In fact, Excelsior Farm has never been charged despite evidence of animal abuse provided to law enforcement officials.

It’s “a desperate attempt to maintain a clean image for the animal agriculture industry,” Soranno told Sentient Media via email. “Surely even a bacon enthusiast could recognize that there is more at stake here; it’s not a dry accusation and condemnation, it’s political.

Activists can choose different strategies for animal protection

Despite the judge’s hopes, most legal penalties meted out to activists do little to deter them, and the animal rights movement is likely no exception. The Excelsior action is part of a bigger “Meat the Victims” movement who sees disobedience to “unjust laws” as a key path to animal liberation. Meanwhile, the Smithfield defendants’ victory is a small but important victory for a very different strategy – progressive actions that use features of the animal agriculture industry against the business of, in this case, diseased animals. and suffering. Having each set new precedents, both cases will have an impact on the future of the movement. Ultimately, activists will have to decide what kinds of actions will best help change public perception of the meat industry to reflect its cruel reality.



Claire is a freelance writer specializing in animals, climate and the environment. She is a regular contributor to Surge Activism and associate editor at Sentient Media.

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Greyhounds board chairman takes aim at RSPCA’s ‘animal rights agenda’ | Horse racing news https://stichtingatar.com/greyhounds-board-chairman-takes-aim-at-rspcas-animal-rights-agenda-horse-racing-news/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 15:48:00 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/greyhounds-board-chairman-takes-aim-at-rspcas-animal-rights-agenda-horse-racing-news/ Denis Walch ” title=”The RSPCA shocked the greyhound racing world last month by calling for the sport to be phased out” class=”js-imageLoader” data-at-xn=”https://www.rp-assets.com /images/news/2020/03/24/77339-max.jpeg” data-br-n=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24/77339-max. jpeg” data-br-m=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24/77339-large.jpeg” data-br-w=”https://www. rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24/77339-large.jpeg” data-br-xw=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24 /77339-large.jpeg” onclick=”return false;”> The RSPCA shocked the greyhound racing world last month by calling for the sport to be phased out Denis Walch The chairman […]]]>

Denis Walch

” title=”The RSPCA shocked the greyhound racing world last month by calling for the sport to be phased out” class=”js-imageLoader” data-at-xn=”https://www.rp-assets.com /images/news/2020/03/24/77339-max.jpeg” data-br-n=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24/77339-max. jpeg” data-br-m=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24/77339-large.jpeg” data-br-w=”https://www. rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24/77339-large.jpeg” data-br-xw=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2020/03/24 /77339-large.jpeg” onclick=”return false;”>

The RSPCA shocked the greyhound racing world last month by calling for the sport to be phased out

Denis Walch

The chairman of the Greyhound Board of Great Britain has accused the RSPCA of being dishonest in its motives for demanding a ban on greyhound racing in Britain within five years.

The RSPCA dropped a bombshell on greyhound racing in September when it joined forces with Blue Cross and Dogs Trust to call for the sport to be phased out.

GBGB chairman Jeremy Cooper, also a former RSPCA chief executive and director of the Dogs Trust, was speaking to the Racing Post for a major investigation in the Sunday paper which explores whether the main charity is changing its attitude towards sports animals in light of this announcement and the potentially catastrophic consequences for horse racing. The Racing Post also spoke to the BHA, its former chief executive Nick Rust and RSPCA wellbeing expert Dr Samantha Gaines.

The timing of the RSPCA’s decision came as a particular shock to GBGB, as it came just four months after the publication of a well-received new welfare strategy, ‘A Good Life for Every Greyhound’, drawn up by its independent director, Professor Madeleine Campbell. , a highly respected veterinarian and recognized animal welfare expert.

Cooper, who has been chair of GBGB since June 2018, said: “One of the main priorities [when I became chairman] was to design and implement a breakthrough wellness strategy to continue this great initial work and bring standards to a level never seen before.

“Professor Madeleine Campbell is one of the few people in the world qualified to do the kind of work we asked her to do. What she has produced is probably one of the best animal welfare strategies written. So I don’t understand why the RSPCA is asking for a ban.It makes me believe that there are other reasons why the RSPCA has taken its position.

Clarifying what he sees as the reason for the RSPCA ban, Cooper added: “In my view this is all driven by an animal rights agenda which is not just about greyhound racing – what if charities and their supporters are successfully pushing this ban forward, don’t think for a minute it will stop there.”

Read more about Jeremy Cooper, Nick Rust, Dr. Samantha Gaines and the BHA in The Big Read, available in Sunday’s newspaper or online to Member’s Club Ultimate subscribers from 6 p.m. Saturday. Click on here register


The lead runner is our latest email newsletter available exclusively to Subscribers of Member’s Club Ultimate. Four-time Racing Reporter of the Year award winner Chris Cook offers his thoughts on the day’s biggest stories and tips for the race ahead every morning Monday through Friday. Not a member of Members’ Club Ultimate? Click here to sign up today and also receive our ultimate daily emails as well as our full range of fantastic website and newspaper content


FIRST PUBLICATION 3:00 PM, 21 OCT 2022

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New Zealand greyhound racing under threat as animal rights groups push for ban https://stichtingatar.com/new-zealand-greyhound-racing-under-threat-as-animal-rights-groups-push-for-ban/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 11:34:55 +0000 https://stichtingatar.com/new-zealand-greyhound-racing-under-threat-as-animal-rights-groups-push-for-ban/ Greyhound Racing New Zealand is disappointed to learn that the Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) has launched a campaign advocating an end to commercial greyhound racing in New Zealand. In a statement, GRNZ said: “Many people are aware that our industry has been under scrutiny since the publication […]]]>

Greyhound Racing New Zealand is disappointed to learn that the Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) has launched a campaign advocating an end to commercial greyhound racing in New Zealand.

In a statement, GRNZ said: “Many people are aware that our industry has been under scrutiny since the publication of the Robertson Review in September 2021.

“This review is currently ongoing and GRNZ will submit its final progress report to the Minister of Racing in mid-December.

“It would be premature for decisions to be made before that.”

GRNZ has made significant inroads in the areas of animal welfare and runway safety in recent years, and has made exponential progress in the past year alone.

Euthanizing greyhounds for no other reason than that they are no longer competitive on a racetrack has now been eradicated entirely.

“We recognize that injuries still exist, but we are constantly working on ways to prevent, reduce and lessen the effects of injuries,” the statement added.

“The Reassignment Rehabilitation Program continues to be our go-to rehabilitation program for Greyhounds who sustain race day injuries.

“This is a GRNZ funded scheme, where greyhounds injured on the trail are rehabilitated before entering the rehousing scheme.

“In April 2022, we introduced a preferred box draw driver for low grade sighthounds where sighthounds are assigned their boxes based on their first racing traits (rail, straight, wide).

“Early evidence suggests this is effective in reducing serious injury rates.

“Favorite Box Draw Races is a first in Australasia.

“We also continue to make significant investments in track safety and infrastructure.

“For GRNZ, animal welfare is paramount, which is why we are about to begin construction of our first straight track in New Zealand.

“This track will be located in Wanganui and we expect it to open in April 2023.

“Additionally, GRNZ has recently hired a new National Track Manager, who is a leading track authority in Australasia.

“This person will oversee all greyhound tracks in New Zealand, including the training of track keepers, ensuring the safest possible presentation of our tracks.”

In addition, the GRNZ Animal Health and Welfare Committee and the Serious Injury Review Committee play a vital role in injury prevention, reduction and mitigation.

Since March 1, 2022, all registered racing greyhounds must be vaccinated, and puppies must also be vaccinated since September 1, 2022.

Again, New Zealand is ahead of its Australian counterparts in this area.

“The love and care our Authorized Persons have for their Greyhounds is second to none, and the fact that 521 Greyhounds were housed through the Great Mates Rehoming Program last season is a testament to how well these beautiful animals are socialized. “, said GRNZ.

“Additionally, when our Greyhounds enter the Great Mates Rehoming program, there are no time constraints or constraints on when the Greyhounds should be adopted.

“Every greyhound has the opportunity to live out the rest of their life as a pet at the end of their racing career.

“GRNZ has nothing to hide.

“All of the race stewards’ reports are available on our website, and all of our quarterly reports are also posted on our website.

“Our quarterly reports contain more detail on all the improvements our industry has made and continues to make.

“These quarterly reports also include all injury statistics, as well as euthanasia and race day and non-race day mortality information.

“Conversely, we note that the New Zealand SPCA does not publish its euthanasia rates anywhere.

“The RSPCA Australia, however, does this every year.

“In summary, we consider it highly inappropriate for any charity to devote significant time, money and resources to this campaign, particularly when a robust independent review process is already underway. .”

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